2009 Food Plots....

Any questions or Information you have about Food Plots...

2009 Food Plots....

Postby SJohnson » Thu Mar 05, 2009 8:05 pm

Anyone getting ready to break ground on the food plots this year...??

I started one in the backyard last year, but never actually planted anything... I tilled everything up and limed it a little, but wasn't comfortable planting my expensive clover with the current state of the ground...

I was thinking about bringing in a small load of top soil and then tilling that into my plot... Anyone got any tips or tricks..?? One good thing is since it is in the backyard I can water it, which I think will make a HUGE difference in the outcome...
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Postby nyturkeyduster » Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:05 pm

I live on a farm so I used manure that sat in the pile for a while until it was a rich dark color. Another great idea is spreading your compost over it and hitting it with a few bags of 10-10-10 fertilizer.
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Postby SJohnson » Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:11 pm

That might be the ticket.... Although I'm not sure the neighbors or my wife would be real happy with that... I have 2 acres, but it's in the middle of a neighborhood with houses all around me...

Bringing in manure for my "deer food plot" probably isn't going to fly very well....hahaha

Although I haven't heard any complaints about my 10ft tall feeder in the back yard... Although I guess I wouldn't really... What are they going to do, come knock on the door and tell me they don't like it...?? I don't think that would be a great idea...HAHA
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Postby nyturkeyduster » Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:18 pm

Once the manure sits in the pile for a month or so, it loses its odor and smells like fresh earth. You can get this cheap if not free for a truckload from any local farmer. Ask around Steve.
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Postby SJohnson » Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:27 pm

nyturkeyduster wrote:Once the manure sits in the pile for a month or so, it loses its odor and smells like fresh earth. You can get this cheap if not free for a truckload from any local farmer. Ask around Steve.


Now that is some very interesting information right there, because I had a guy come out last year to "fix" my yard... And he wanted $4,500 to bring in Manure, which he said was like $2,500 of the cost and some top soil and reseed the whole thing...

Needless to say my yard still isn't "fixed"... But I might have to find me a horse farm with some manure laying around... Now I just need a dump truck...haha
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Postby adaye » Fri Mar 06, 2009 9:58 pm

What do you mean find a horse farm. There's plenty of horse's in the neighborhood. All you have to do is go over there with a shovel and a wheel barrel.

Just let me know before you do so I can take pics and post them on the site. HAHA...

FYI, my dad used to pland clover in the back yard for a number of years, he just fertilized and it came in pretty well. You just want to make sure you turn the ground over real well.
Not to say adding compost isn't a good idea, just may not be neccesary.

Being able to water it will help also because by August it can go dormaint due to the heat and not much rain typically that time of the year.
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Postby adaye » Fri Mar 06, 2009 10:09 pm

I will add that it always did draw the deer quite well.

Anyway, Good luck with the plot. They already seem to love your feeder.

And before the neighbors say anything about the 10ft. tall feeder in your back yard, they will probably complain about me shooting groundhogs in the back yard with the 17hmr. Not to mention I shot a doe with the bow about 4 years ago that about dropped in one of the neighbors yards. HAHA..
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Postby SJohnson » Sat Mar 07, 2009 9:21 am

HAHA... I was thinking there would be a huge pile with a bulldozer to load a trailer.... Shovel and Wheelbar sounds a little too much like serious work to me....hahaaha

Yeah I was always worried about where the deer die around here... O well...hahaha It'll be ok...
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Postby Southern Man » Sat Mar 07, 2009 3:46 pm

Horse crap, cow crap, or any kind of crap is full of nitrogen. Clover doesn't require alot of nitrogen. Potash (potassium) is what clover likes. All things need nitrogen to grown and some think the more the better, but that's not the case with clover. Proper ph is prolly the best thing you can do for your plot.
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Postby SJohnson » Sat Mar 07, 2009 7:16 pm

Southern Man wrote:Horse crap, cow crap, or any kind of crap is full of nitrogen. Clover doesn't require alot of nitrogen. Potash (potassium) is what clover likes. All things need nitrogen to grown and some think the more the better, but that's not the case with clover. Proper ph is prolly the best thing you can do for your plot.


So lime would be the key to growing clover..?? I am going to get this together here soon... I'd really like to have a serious food plot in the backyard...

Be nice to not have to lug 300 pounds of corn out to the feeder every week just to see the deer... Plus I think the big boys are more "trusting" of a food plot then the feeder... I got lots of pics during the rut of nice bucks in the backyard, but not 1 was actually eating out of the feeder...
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