Lyme's Disease, Hunters Beware

Steve Sheetz

  • Keywords -
  • Category Deer Hunting
  • Region -
  • Prostaff Member Steve Sheetz

As the leaves on the trees begin to turn green and the days warm, many of us will be heading to the woods, to hunt shed antlers. Unfortunately lurking in the woods is a hidden danger, the Blacklegged Tick, and the Lyme's Disease that it can spread. Recently a good friend went through it, and survived, but not without some suffering and he nearly missed the 2011 hunting season. I pulled together information from various government websites, including the Center for Disease Control. I hope this helps everyone, stay safe in the woods.

Lyme Disease Transmission
English: National Lyme disease risk map with 4...

Image via Wikipedia

The Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, is spread through the bite of infected ticks. The blacklegged tick (or deer tick, Ixodes scapularis) spreads the disease in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central United States, and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) spreads the disease on the Pacific Coast. Ticks can attach to any part of the human body but are often found in hard-to-see areas such as the groin, armpits, and scalp. In most cases, the tick must be attached for 36-48 hours or more before the Lyme disease bacterium can be transmitted.

Most humans are infected through the bites of immature ticks called nymphs. Nymphs are tiny (less than 2 mm) and difficult to see; they feed during the spring and summer months. Adult ticks can also transmit Lyme disease bacteria, but they are much larger and may be more likely to be discovered and removed before they have had time to transmit the bacteria. Adult Ixodes ticks are most active during the cooler months of the year.

All About Blacklegged Ticks
Relative sizes of several ticks at different life stages. In general, adult ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed and nymphal ticks are approximately the size of a poppy seed. Are there other ways to get Lyme disease?

 English: Image showing appearance and relative...

There is no evidence that Lyme disease is transmitted from person-to-person. For example, a person cannot get infected from touching, kissing or having sex with a person who has Lyme disease. Lyme disease acquired during pregnancy may lead to infection of the placenta and possible stillbirth; however, no negative effects on the fetus have been found when the mother receives appropriate antibiotic treatment. There are no reports of Lyme disease transmission from breast milk. Although no cases of Lyme disease have been linked to blood transfusion, scientists have found that the Lyme disease bacteria can live in blood that is stored for donation. Individuals being treated for Lyme disease with an antibiotic should not donate blood. Individuals who have completed antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease may be considered as potential blood donors. Information on the current criteria for blood donation is available on the Red Cross website at http://www.redcross.org/donate/give/.

Although dogs and cats can get Lyme disease, there is no evidence that they spread the disease directly to their owners. However, pets can bring infected ticks into your home or yard. Consider protecting your pet, and possibly yourself, through the use of tick control products for animals. You will not get Lyme disease from eating venison or squirrel meat, but in keeping with general food safety principles meat should always be cooked thoroughly. Note that hunting and dressing deer or squirrels may bring you into close contact with infected ticks. There is no credible evidence that Lyme disease can be transmitted through air, food, water, or from the bites of mosquitoes, flies, fleas, or lice.

Ticks not known to transmit Lyme disease include Lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum), the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus).

Preventing Tick Bites

While it is a good idea to take preventive measures against ticks year-round, be extra vigilant in warmer months (April-September) when ticks are most active. Unfortunately for hunters this is the time we spend in the woods with the least amount of protection getting our hunting locations ready for the next fall.

    • Avoid Direct Contact with Ticks
    • Avoid wooded and bushy areas with high grass and leaf litter.
    • Walk in the center of trails.
    • Repel Ticks with DEET or Permethrin
    • Use repellents that contain 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) on the exposed skin for protection that lasts up to several hours. Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding hands, eyes, and mouth.
    • Use products that contain permethrin on clothing. Treat clothing and gear, such as boots, pants, socks and tents. It remains protective through several washings. Pre-treated clothing is available and remains protective for up to 70 washings.
    • Other repellents registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may be found at http://cfpub.epa.gov/oppref/insect/.
    • Find and Remove Ticks from Your Body
    • Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within two hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that are crawling on you.
    • Conduct a full-body tick check using a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body upon return from tick-infested areas. Parents should check their children for ticks under the arms, in and around the ears, inside the belly button, behind the knees, between the legs, around the waist, and especially in their hair.
    • Examine gear and pets. Ticks can ride into the home on clothing and pets, then attach to a person later, so carefully examine pets, coats, and day packs.
    • Tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for an hour to kill remaining ticks.
Tick Removal

If you find a tick attached to your skin, there's no need to panic.

English: safe tick removal Fran├žais : enlever ...

Image via Wikipedia

There are several tick removal devices on the market, but a plain set of fine-tipped tweezers will remove a tick quite effectively. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don't twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth easily with clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the skin heal. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.

 Avoid folklore remedies such as "painting" the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick detach from the skin. Your goal is to remove the tick as quickly as possible--not waiting for it to detach.

Follow-up

If you develop a rash or fever within several weeks of removing a tick, see your doctor. Be sure to tell the doctor about your recent tick bite, when the bite occurred, and where you most likely acquired the tick.

How Do You Know if You Have Lyme's Disease?

Early localized stage (3-30 days post-tick bite)

  • Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM)
  • Fatigue, chills, fever, headache, muscle and joint aches, and swollen lymph nodes
  • Some people may get these general symptoms in addition to an EM rash, but in others, these general symptoms may be the only evidence of infection.
  • Some people get a small bump or redness at the site of a tick bite that goes away in 1-2 days, like a mosquito bite. This is not a sign that you have Lyme disease.
  • Rash occurs in approximately 70-80% of infected persons1 and begins at the site of a tick bite after a delay of 3-30 days (average is about 7 days).
  • English: Erythematous rash in the pattern of a...

    Image via Wikipedia

  • Rash gradually expands over a period of several days, and can reach up to 12 inches (30 cm) across. Parts of the rash may clear as it enlarges, resulting in a "bull's-eye" appearance.
  • Rash usually feels warm to the touch but is rarely itchy or painful.
  • EM lesions may appear on any area of the body

 

 

Early disseminated stage (days to weeks post-tick bite)

    • Untreated, the infection may spread from the site of the bite to other parts of the body, producing an array of specific symptoms that may come and go, including:
    • Additional EM lesions in other areas of the body
    • Facial or Bell's palsy (loss of muscle tone on one or both sides of the face)

     ?esky: Obrna n.facialis English: Bell's palsy ...

    • Severe headaches and neck stiffness due to meningitis (inflammation of the spinal cord)
    • Pain and swelling in the large joints (such as knees)
    • Shooting pains that may interfere with sleep
    • Heart palpitations and dizziness due to changes in heartbeat

Many of these symptoms will resolve over a period of weeks to months, even without treatment. However, lack of treatment can result in additional complications, described below. 

Late disseminated stage (months-to-years post-tick bite)

    • Approximately 60% of patients with untreated infection may begin to have intermittent bouts of arthritis, with severe joint pain and swelling. Large joints are most often affected, particularly the knees3. Arthritis caused by Lyme disease manifests differently than other causes of arthritis and must be distinguished from arthralgias (pain, but not swelling, in joints).
    • Up to 5% of untreated patients may develop chronic neurological complaints months to years after infection4. These include shooting pains, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, and problems with short-term memory.
Arthritis
    • Pain and swelling in the large joints (such as knees) can occur.
    • Lingering symptoms after treatment (post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome)
    • Approximately 10-20% of patients with Lyme disease have symptoms that last months to years after treatment with antibiotics5. These symptoms can include muscle and joint pains, cognitive defects, sleep disturbance, or fatigue. The cause of these symptoms is not known, but there is no evidence that these symptoms are due to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi. This condition is referred to as Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). There is some evidence that PTLDS is caused by an autoimmune response, in which a person's immune system continues to respond, doing damage to the body's tissues, even after the infection has been cleared. Studies have shown that continuing antibiotic therapy is not helpful and can be harmful for persons with PTLDS.

Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

Approximately 10 to 20% of patients treated for Lyme disease with a recommended 2-4 week course of antibiotics will have lingering symptoms of fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches1. In some cases, these can last for more than 6 months. Although often called "chronic Lyme disease," this condition is properly known as "Post-treatment Lyme disease Syndrome" (PTLDS).

The exact cause of PTLDS is not yet known. Most medical experts believe that lingering symptoms are due to residual damage to the tissues and the immune system that occurred during the infection. Similar complications and auto-immune responses are known to occur following other infectious diseases.

In contrast, a few health care providers tell patients that these symptoms reflect persistent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. However, there is no credible scientific evidence that PTLDS is caused by persistent infection. More importantly, studies have shown that patients treated with prolonged courses of antibiotics do not do better than patients treated with placebo.

The good news is that patients with PTLDS almost always get better with time; the bad news is that it can take months or even years to feel completely well. If you have been treated for Lyme disease and still feel unwell, see your doctor to discuss how to relieve your suffering. Doctors may want to treat you in ways similar to patients who have fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome. This does not mean that your doctor is dismissing your pain or saying that you have these conditions instead. It simply means that the doctor is trying to help you cope with your symptoms using the tools available.

You may be tempted to try treatments that are unproven or non-standard in order to feel better. Unfortunately, many fraudulent products claiming to treat "chronic Lyme disease" are available on the internet or through some providers. These products have not been shown to help and can be toxic and even deadly. It is normal to feel overwhelmed by your ongoing symptoms. Some things that may help you manage your PTLDS include:
  • Confirm your diagnosis.
  • Make sure that Lyme disease is the only thing affecting your health.
  • Become well-informed. There is a lot of inaccurate information available, especially on the internet. Learn how to sort through this maze.
  • Track your symptoms. It can be helpful to keep a diary of your symptoms, sleep patterns, diet, and exercise to see how these influence your well being.
  • Maintain a healthy diet and get plenty of rest.
  • Share your feelings. If your family and friends can't provide the support you need, talk with a counselor who can help you find ways of managing your life during this difficult time. As with any illness, Lyme disease can affect you and your loved ones. It doesn't mean that your symptoms are not real. It means that you are a human being who needs extra support in a time of need.
      The above information was taken from the CDC website. www.cdc.gov. If you think that you or a loved one may have Lyme's Disease, please seek medical attention immediately.

    Posted by Steve Sheetz under Deer Hunting on February 9, 12 10:03 AM | Permalink

    No TrackBacks

    TrackBack URL: http://www.huntonly.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-tb.cgi/644

    Leave a comment